Wellness

Sorting Through Supplements - how to tell if the supplement is worth buying

Sorting Through Supplements - how to tell if the supplement is worth buying

The world of equine feed supplements can be confusing and overwhelming. The shelves of any tack or feed store are lined with as many different supplements as there are breeds of horses and it often seems like the cost for the “same” supplement can vary greatly. So how do you know you are buying the supplement you actually want? And do you really “get what you pay for” in the world of horse supplements?

Fall Seminar 2016 - Senior Horses - A Focus on the Care and Quality of Life of Older Horses

Fall Seminar 2016 - Senior Horses - A Focus on the Care and Quality of Life of Older Horses

Dr. Lindsay Rogers discusses topics of importance to the care of senior horses, including weight control and feeding, winter care, herd and housing management, and diseases that are more common in geriatric horses. She offers advice on monitoring and optimizing the quality of life for individual older horses, with lots of awesome examples from her own eccentric herd of equine seniors.

Saying Goodbye: a discussion about euthanasia

Saying Goodbye: a discussion about euthanasia

Euthanasia is a term that comes from the Greek language and translated into English means “good death.”  The most common method of euthanasia is via a lethal injection of a barbituate drug, but other methods may also produce a “good death.”  There are many reasons for an owner to choose euthanasia and the decision to euthanize a horse is often a difficult and deeply personal for the owner.

Wellness Plans

Wellness Plans

Burwash Equine Services is proud to announce the addition of Wellness Plans to our list of services!  These greatly anticipated plans were designed with our clients’ needs in mind and we hope that you will find them helpful both in keeping your beloved horses healthy and saving yourself a bit of money as well.  The concept behind these plans is that once you subscribe to a plan, your horse will receive an entire package of services over the course of the year.  Clients have the option of purchasing the entire package up front or making monthly payments (please note that this is subject to approval).  Our goal is to help ease the expenses that are encountered by many of our clients at certain times of the year, by spreading it out into smaller monthly payments.  Considering the current economic conditions, we trust you will find this is a good option!

Available wellness plans include The Mighty Comrade (pleasure horse plan), The Golden Oldie (senior horse plan), The Next Generation (mare and foal plan), and the Bronze, Silver and Gold Olympian plans (basic, intermediate and advanced athlete plans).  Each package includes a specified set of services that will be provided over the course of a year – please contact the clinic for additional details!

 

Forage Alternatives

Forage Alternatives

FEEDING WHEN HAY IS SHORT—WHAT ARE THE ALTERNATIVES?

 

As Presented by Dr. Alyssa Butters,

2009 Equine Services Fall Seminar

 

            With the poor weather during the growing season this year and the widespread shortage of hay, many people have been faced with the prospect of paying for very expensive hay for their horses, or even having difficulty finding hay altogether.  Therefore, a commonly heard question has become—with what can I replace hay in my horse’s diet?

 So why do we feed hay in the first place?  For most horses, hay should comprise the majority of their daily ration.  For the average adult horse, good grass hay supplies nearly all their daily protein requirement.  Most grass hays contain 9-12% protein, close to the needs of an adult horse at maintenance (10-11%).  Hay also provides a good source of fibre.  Although not truly a “nutrient,” horses digestive systems have adapted in environments where they graze almost continuously throughout the day, and they have a drive to consume fibre.  No absolute minimal level of necessary fibre has been established, however inadequate dietary fibre can lead to increased wood chewing behavior and can increase the incidence of colic and gastric ulcers.