health and wellness program

Fall Seminar 2016 - Senior Horses - A Focus on the Care and Quality of Life of Older Horses

Fall Seminar 2016 - Senior Horses - A Focus on the Care and Quality of Life of Older Horses

Dr. Lindsay Rogers discusses topics of importance to the care of senior horses, including weight control and feeding, winter care, herd and housing management, and diseases that are more common in geriatric horses. She offers advice on monitoring and optimizing the quality of life for individual older horses, with lots of awesome examples from her own eccentric herd of equine seniors.

Wellness Plans

Wellness Plans

Burwash Equine Services is proud to announce the addition of Wellness Plans to our list of services!  These greatly anticipated plans were designed with our clients’ needs in mind and we hope that you will find them helpful in keeping your beloved horses healthy.  The concept behind these plans is that once you subscribe to a plan, your horse will receive an entire package of services over the course of the year.  Clients have the option of purchasing the entire package up front or making monthly payments (please note that this is subject to approval).  Our goal is to help ease the expenses that are encountered by many of our clients at certain times of the year, by spreading it out into smaller monthly payments.  Considering the current economic conditions, we trust you will find this is a good option!

Available wellness plans include The Mighty Comrade (pleasure horse plan), The Golden Oldie (senior horse plan), The Next Generation (mare and foal plan), and the Bronze, Silver and Gold Olympian plans (basic, intermediate and advanced athlete plans).  Each package includes a specified set of services that will be provided over the course of a year – please contact the clinic for additional details!

 

Vaccination FAQ - Why is the Strangles vaccine intranasal? Isn’t there an intramuscular vaccine available?

Vaccination FAQ - Why is the Strangles vaccine intranasal?  Isn’t there an intramuscular vaccine available?

The theory of an intranasal vaccine for Strangles is that the site of entry and infection with Strangles is via the tonsils located in the nose and mouth.  If we stimulate immunity at these sites by introducing a vaccine directly to those tonsils, we can limit the propagation of the bacteria at its site of entry.  The Strangles vaccine most commonly used is a modified live bacterial vaccine, which is unable to replicate but mimics the immunity stimulated by a natural infection. However, its efficacy is dependent on an adequate amount of the vaccine reaching the tonsils deep in the head, so it must be administered via the nasal passageways.

Rabies in Alberta—Should We Be Vaccinating Horses?

Rabies in Alberta—Should We Be Vaccinating Horses?

Alberta stands out as one of the few jurisdictions in North America in which horses are not routinely vaccinated against rabies.  Arguments have always been that the incidence of rabies is much lower than in other regions, and there have been no reported equine cases of rabies in years, so the risk of infection would be so low as not to necessitate vaccination.  The rabies vaccine must be administered by a veterinarian, another potential stumbling block to widespread vaccination of equines. 

The rate of rabies in potential sources of infection within Alberta is the same whether we are considering a wildlife vector could infect a dog, a cat, or a horse.  Yet rabies vaccination of our small animal companions is routine whereas vaccination of horses is almost non-existent.  Although relatively rare, rabies is present in wildlife populations in Alberta, clinical disease should it occur is untreatable and (almost) invariably fatal, and a rabid companion animal or even horse can have very significant public health ramifications.  Should we be revisiting this policy of non-vaccination of horses in Alberta?

Why We Vaccinate - Equine Influenza

Why We Vaccinate - Equine Influenza

Equine Influenza Virus (EIV) is often cited as the most commonly diagnosed and economically important causes of viral respiratory disease in horses.  Therefore, the AAEP states that “all horses should be vaccinated against EIV unless they live in a closed and isolated facility.”  Like many other respiratory viruses, it produces fever, nasal discharge, and coughing.  So what sets this virus apart from other equine respiratory viruses?

Vaccination FAQ - Potomac Horse Fever?

Vaccination FAQ - Potomac Horse Fever?

  Potomac Horse Fever can cause very serious diarrhea, and other symptoms may include fever, laminitis, and colic.  It is caused by Neorickettsia risticii, a bacteria found in freshwater snails that is believed to be transmitted to horses via inadvertent ingestion of infected aquatic insects.  It is usually seasonal, seen most commonly in the hot summer months or early fall. If Potomac Horse Fever has occurred in a particular geographic area, it is likely that additional cases will occur in future years. However, vaccination against this disease has been controversial.  Evidence of protection against clinical disease is lacking, possibly because the vaccine may not stimulate a protective immune response, or potentially because multiple strains of the bacteria may exist, whereas only one strain is present in the available vaccine.