Foals

Placentitis - a reason for monitoring your pregnant mare

Placentitis - a reason for monitoring your pregnant mare

Foaling season is once again approaching and many pregnant mares have been left out on pasture to eat to their heart’s content over the winter. Often pregnant mares have minimal monitoring throughout most of their pregnancy, but there is a strong case to be made for closer monitoring, especially in mid to late gestation due to the risk of placentitis.

When Foaling Is Imminent

When Foaling Is Imminent

In our last post, we covered the signs to monitor in your mare that she is close to foaling.  Here we will cover how to prepare for your foal’s arrival.  These include the stages of labor, foaling kit essentials, and a few of the more common foaling problems.

 

Mares should have a clean and dry area on which to foal, that is free from too many disturbances.  They can foal inside or outside, depending on the time of year and the weather.  If your mare is to foal inside, straw is the recommended bedding.  Having a stocked foaling kit nearby with some basic supplies will also be helpful.  The foaling kit essentials include:

When is my mare going to foal?

When is my mare going to foal?

This is the first post in a series about foaling out your mare.

Foaling season is upon us and mare owners everywhere are left guessing as to when their mares are going to foal.  Watching your mare can be frustrating and confusing, but knowing some basics and being prepared can go along way to help bring a healthy foal into the world, or to help save a sick one.  This spring we will have a series of posts about foaling – what to watch for when your mare is close to foaling, how to be prepared, what to do once the foal is on the ground, and when to breed back your mare.  This first post in the series covers information on the signs that your mare is close to foaling.